The logical thing to do with a knitting blog that hasn’t been updated in six years would be to abandon it.  But, I want to post about adding silicone grippers to your running shorts and rather than creating a running blog for that purpose I’m just going to do it here.  Also, I am planning on coffeeneuring soon and need a place to document it.

ADDING SILICONE GRIPPERS TO YOUR RUNNING SHORTS:

Some shorts come with grippers!  These shorts are great because they are less likely to ride up your legs.  Almost all cycling shorts have them, and my rugby shorts have a version at the waistband (to keep your jersey tucked in?) but they are few and far between on run shorts, even the ones with liners. The no-longer-in-production brooks glycerin 2-in-1 3.5 inch short have them, which was one of the factors making them my #1 go-to short for awhile.

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If you google “how to add silicone grippers to your shorts” there are two suggestions:  First, buy silicone backed elastic online and sew it in, and second, experiment with automotive silicone.  The person who suggested automotive silicone was mocked on the cycling forum it was posted on.  Originally I thought maybe that was because it was a bad idea, but after further research it turns out it was just because cycling forums are full of jerks.

I started by buying silicone backed elastic online and sewing it into my shorts.  This was a pain. I used a free-motion quilting foot because the silicone was sticking to the other foot.  Putting masking tape over the silicone while sewing and removing it afterwards might have helped this.  My stitching is VERY wonky.  IMG_0859

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Then I bought Permatex high temp silicone RTV gasket from amazon.  For my first try I inflated balloon-like-objects to put in the legs as I applied it.  This was unnecessary and I had better results on the second pair of shorts, which I just applied flat. I did this out on my patio both to protect my carpet from spills, and because the instructions call for using in well ventilated areas.IMG_0927

It’s been almost two years since this experiment, and I wear the shorts that I sewed the elastic into only occasionally and the automotive silicone shorts very often. They ride up SIGNIFICANTLY LESS than before, though I do have to tug them down occasionally. I machine wash cold and hang to dry, and they are holding up great.

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You can download the Safety Data Sheet here if you are concerned about chemicals.  I am not a scientist, but I browsed it and it looked okay to me.

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